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The best views in Hong Kong – according to Lonely Planet travel experts

Boasting one of the most iconic skylines in the world, Hong Kong is a cornucopia of architectural marvels and natural wonders.

We live in a city where Skyscrapers collide with expansive oceans, white beaches and volcanic rock formations; and whether we’re hiking to drink in our fill of the city below or making our way out of the urban jungle and towards greener pastures, the views in Hong Kong are second to none. Intrigued as to what the experts think however, we looked to Lonely Planet for its top recommendations. Did your favourite make the list?

The best views in Hong Kong:

Victoria Peak

Best views in Hong Kong Victoria Peak
Image courtesy of Florian Wehde via Unsplash

Perhaps the most obvious, yet warranted contender on the list; Victoria Peak offers up unbeatable views of Hong Kong that attracts countless residents and tourists alike. Take a stroll along the Morning Trail for a 360 degree vista that never fails to take our breath away – even on the gloomiest of days.

SEVVA

When it comes to inner city vistas, SEVVA steals the show with its wrap-around terrace. A guaranteed crowd-pleaser if you have family or friends in town, its contemporary cocktails enjoyed overlooking bright neon lights remains unmatched amongst Central’s competitive bar scene.

Tai Long Wan

Tai_Long_Wan_-_Sai_Kung_(Hong_Kong)
Image courtesy of Wikipedia user TK under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

You’re guaranteed killer views from most Hong Kong hiking trails, but the trek across to Tai Long Wan is particularly spectacular if you’ve had your fill of sky scrappers. Lush greenery and emerald waters accompany you as you make your from Sai Kung Pavilion to one of the best beaches in Hong Kong, so you’ll want to make sure your phone is fully charged so you can snap your fill of these panoramic views.

Tung Ping Chau

Tung Ping Chau
Image courtesy of Wiki user TK under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

Lonely Planet describes Tung Ping Chau as “stunning sedimentary rocks resembling layered sponge cakes,” and we can’t unsee it. A part of Hong Kong’s UNESCO Global Geopark, the geomorphic wonder is a unique slice of the city that many may not know to look out for. Surrounded by clear waters, the Tung Ping Chau area is bursting with rock pools, rock formations and hidden beaches.

InterContinental Lobby Lounge

Bringing it back harbour side, those seeking iconic seascapes can hole up for afternoon tea at the InterContinental Lobby Lounge. Savour a cuppa accompanied by some of the best views in Hong Kong – from Kowloon side – and drink in your fill of the Star Ferry, towering buildings and luxury yachts.

Sai Wan Swimming Shed

Sai Wan Swimming Shed
Image courtesy of Flickr user Lulu Lee under the Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license

Those in the know flock to Sai Wan Swimming Shed for iconic Instagram images, guaranteed to hike up those ‘likes.’ A playground for photographers, this unique spot in the Western district offers up unobstructed views away from the harbour and out over towards Discovery Bay and Lamma Island. As you can imagine, sunrises and sunsets are in full glory here, and despite being elbow-to-elbow with others hoping to capture the same shot – it’s worth it.

Ocean Park

Featured in just about every Hong Kong travel guide that you can think of, the OG of theme parks’ prime location makes for some incontestable views. Perched high up on the mountain side, take a spin on the cable car to capture some exemplary shots of Hong Kong’s stunning Southside. For an even better vantage point, ride the ‘Hair Raiser’ – but perhaps leave your phone in your bag for this one.

High Island Reservoir East Dam

Best views in Hong Kong
Image courtesy of Flickr user Fung1981 Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License.

140-million-year-old volcanic rocks make this one of Hong Kong’s most breathtaking places. Stage one of the MacLehose Trail, don your hiking gear and head out to High Island Resovoir, one of the more easily accessible parts of Hong Kong Global Geopark. The East Dam is a surreal sight, featuring thousands of reinforced concrete blocks placed along the coast to break up sea waves.

Featured and hero image courtesy of Flickr user Lulu Lee under the Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license

Lexi Davey
Managing Editor
A typical ‘third culture’ kid, Lexi spent the best part of her life between Hong Kong and Malaysia. A self-confessed heliophile with a thirst for travel and adventure, she moved home to foster a career in digital editing and lifestyle copywriting. Loves include: commas, nervous laughter and her rescue pup, Wella