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Over the past nine years, Instagram has been changing the way we consume art, sometimes even propelling emerging artists to fame.
The image-sharing app, where the hashtag #art appears on more than 526 million posts, also allows outsiders to get an inside-look into prominent art institutions.
While recent studies have been pointing out the lack of diversity in major museum collections, some accounts posting art on Instagram try to mend this imbalance, highlighting the work of non-male and non-white artists.
Here is a selection of five of accounts offering a unique and distinct vision into the art world:

Hans Ulrich Obrist, @hansulrichobrist

 

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Precious Okoyomon Question 41 Is there any darkness that isn’t black? Is there any light that isn’t blackness? #preciousokoyomon #serpentinegalleries #claudeadjil #gerhardrichter

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The Swiss curator, who is also the artistic director of London-based Serpentine Galleries, boasts a sizable 270.1k following.
Obrist famously staged his first exhibition, entitled ‘The Kitchen Show’, in his kitchen, while he was a student of political economics at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland.
His account features photographs of handwritten doodles from his friends, including New York-based pop artist Sarah Morris, British artist Duggie Fields, American filmmaker David Lynch, and Chilean poet Cecilia Vicuña.

Banksy, @banksy

 

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. I made a customised stab-proof vest and thought – who could possibly wear this? Stormzy at Glastonbury.

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The anonymous British artist has an unpredictable Instagram account, where his 6.2 million followers discover his latest street art projects.
New artworks appear unannounced like his recent collaboration with British rapper Stormzy, for whom he designed a customised stab-proof vest ahead of his set at Glastonbury festival.
Although diverse in nature, Banksy’s artworks tackle timely socio-political themes, including consumerism, climate change and police brutality.

Jennifer Higgie, @jenniferhiggie

 

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This is heartbreaking. The German dancer, choreographer, mask-maker and sculptor Oda Schottmüller was born 9 February 1905 in Posen. She toured Germany and elsewhere as a dancer and regularly exhibited her sculpture (she is seen here performing ‘Oestliche Vision’ with one of her masks). When war was declared, she remained in Berlin and became an active member of the Red Orchestra (Die Rote Kapelle) the name given by the Gestapo to an anti-Nazi resistance movement. On September 16, 1942 Oda was arrested, convicted of aiding the enemy and sentenced to death; she was murdered by the Nazis in 1943. She was 38. In November 2014, a street in Hamburg was named in her honour. #bowdown #odaschottmüller

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Higgie, who is a writer and co-editor of Frieze Magazine, dedicates her Instagram to women in the arts. Each day, she uploads an artwork by a female artist with a caption outlining her significance in art history across the ages.
Posts have been dedicated to the oeuvre of American writer and journalist Janet Flanner, Ecuadorian painter Araceli Gilbert de Blomberg, and Flemish artist Caterina van Hemessen.

Alice Rawsthorn, @alice.rawsthorn

 

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Designing Libraries | 1. This week’s posts will be on the design of libraries, starting with an exceptionally beautiful one that I visited last week, the Old Library at Trinity College, Dublin. Designed in the early 18th century by the Irish military engineer, Thomas Burgh, the original Old Library took twenty years to build and still dominates the Trinity College campus. The heart of the Old Library is the magnificent oak Long Room, designed by Burgh with a flat roof and transformed in the 1850s with the addition of this barrel-vaulted arch to create more space for Trinity College’s expanding collection of books and manuscripts. There are now over 200,000 books in the Long Room, including such national treasures as the ancient illuminated manuscripts in the Book of Kells, one of Ireland’s oldest and loveliest harps, and a rare surviving copy of the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic. It also sports a fine collection of busts of great philosophers and writers from Aristotle, Homer and Plato, to John Milton, Thomas Parnell and Jonathan Swift. So many tourists troop through the Long Room each day that the students are dispersed among Trinity College’s other library buildings. Yet despite the guided tours and souvenirs, the Long Room is a graceful and imposing tribute to Ireland’s rich literary history, just as a great library should be. #design #architecture #thomasburgh @trinitycollegedublin theoldlibrary #thelongroom #designinglibraries Photography: Thibaud Poirier

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Design critic for The New York Times Alice Rawsthorn describes her Instagram account as her “daily diary on design”, which is followed by 58.5k people.
Each week, she picks a different topic and illustrates it with an image accompanied with a detailed caption.
Rawsthorn sometimes focuses on prominent architects and designers from across the world, such as Marcel Breuer, Charlie Rennie Mackintosh, and Louise Brigham.

Danielle Krysa, @thejealouscurator

 

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Stunning, beautifully painted, candy-hued, stare-into-your-soul portraits by @jenny_morgan_jm on the site today, link in profile

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Artist and writer Danielle Krysa created her website The Jealous Curator in 2009, to highlight artworks by fellow contemporary artists that “made [her] jealous”.
Her Instagram account, which is followed by some 193k people, is an extension of the website, featuring a new international artist each day.

This article is published via AFP Relaxnews