It’s been almost two weeks that India’s COVID-19 chart has been ascending with over 3 lakh cases daily. Everyone knows someone who is struggling daily to find oxygen concentrators, medicines, and beds. And despite Co-Win registrations, vaccine shortage is not bringing any good news to the table. In testing times such as these, many MNCs have stepped up to help aid India.

Google

Amid an unprecedented surge in COVID-19 cases in India, Sunder Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet, announced funding worth Rs 135 crore last week. This includes two grants from Google.org, Google’s philanthropic arm, totalling Rs 20 crore. The first is to GiveIndia to provide cash assistance to families hit hardest by the crisis to help with their everyday expenses. The second will go to UNICEF to help get urgent medical supplies, including oxygen and testing equipment, to where it’s needed most in India. It also includes donations from our ongoing employee giving campaign — so far, more than 900 Googlers have contributed Rs 3.7 crore for organisations supporting high-risk and marginalised communities.

Microsoft

Microsoft’s Satya Nadella also tweeted a week ago that the company will ”continue to use its voice, resources, and technology to aid relief efforts, and support the purchase of critical oxygen concentration devices”. Last year, Microsoft diversified its efforts in India to help affected people, hospitals, the food industry, and startups during the COVID-19 outbreak. Microsoft partnered with Apollo Hospitals in the nationwide rollout of the Apollo 24/7 healthcare platform by providing Microsoft Azure technologies.

Amazon

Amazon is donating 10,000 oxygen concentrators and BiPAP machines to hospitals and public institutions to augment their capacity to help COVID-19 patients across multiple cities in India. Amazon has joined hands with ACT Grants, Temasek Foundation, Pune Platform for COVID-19 Response (PPCR) and other partners to urgently airlift over 8,000 oxygen concentrators and 500 BiPAP machines from Singapore. Additionally, Amazon India is also procuring over 1,500 oxygen concentrators and other critical medical equipment in partnership with non-profits, including Swasth, Concern India, and impact organisations like ACT Grants and Sattva Consulting.

Zomato

Foodtech giant Zomato’s CEO Deepinder Goyal announced that it kickstarted the “Help Save My India” mission through its not-for-profit arm Feeding India, in association with Delhivery to source oxygen concentrators and related supplies to help hospitals and families in need. As a part of the ‘Help Save My India’ initiative, Zomato is raising Rs 50 crore for Feeding India over the next few days to address the acute shortage of oxygen cylinders and concentrators in the country.

Paytm

Vijay Shekhar Sharma, CEO of Paytm, announced that the Paytm Foundation aims to raise Rs 2 crore through donations to source oxygen concentrators. The company stated that it would donate the same amount of money that people donate to Paytm for the cause. For example, if you donate Rs 1,000 on Paytm for the COVID-19 pandemic, Paytm will add additional Rs 1,000 to the cause. After completing its Rs 2 crore target, Paytm now aims to raise Rs 10 crore. According to Sharma, Paytm has also sourced supplies of different sizes of oxygen concentrators.

Xiaomi India

In an open letter penned by Manu Jain, Managing Director, Mi India, Xiaomi has pledged to donate more than Rs 3 crore to procure 1,000+ oxygen cylinders. The Chinese company said it’d donate the cylinders to hospitals or state governments wherever the need is more urgent. The state governments Xiaomi plans to help include Delhi, Maharashtra, and Karnataka. It also plans on partnering with GiveIndia to raise Rs 1 crore to support frontline COVID-19 workers across the country. The donation page will be live on Mi.com for all fans, partners, and customers who can make their contributions. The company says that it has cut down its budget allocated for giveaways and social media promotions to help raise the money.

Cred

Bengaluru-based fintech startup and unicorn Cred founder, Kunal Shah, tweeted that the company aims to raise funds for procuring 1 billion litres of oxygen. It has partnered with healthcare fundraising platform Milaap to ensure that contributions reach hospitals in need. The most interesting part about Cred’s initiative is that people can contribute to the company’s COVID-19 cause by donating Cred coins they already have in their Cred accounts. Cred is additionally open to funding ideas that can make hospitals self-sufficient in oxygen through oxygen generators on-site or equipping other containers to move oxygen. The company has also set up an in-house COVID task force to collate resources from various sources to help its full-time employees, contractors, and interns in the pandemic.

Ehtereum

Vitalik Buterin, the co-founder of Ehtereum cryptocurrency, has shared proof of transfer of 100 ETH and 100 MKR, worth approximately Rs 4.5 crores, for use in COVID-19 relief in India. Ethereum, the open-source blockchain software founded in 2014, is used to build contracts on the blockchain and has recently been in the news a lot because of its use in the making and transferring of non-fungible tokens (NFTs) — digital collectables that can be uniquely identified and held by individuals. Ethereum has a currency called Ether that is the second biggest cryptocurrency in the world after Bitcoin.

Keventers 

Dairy brand Keventers, in association with EduTennis — an initiative by the Amba Dalmia Foundation Trust — is running a campaign to raise Rs 1 crore to assist Delhi-based hospitals and grass-root organisations with their efforts in providing critical care to COVID 19 patients. The campaign, which has already raised Rs 35 crore from over 100 people, aims to provide oxygen for those in need in Delhi-NCR. If you want to make donations, donate on Ketto.

Hero and featured images: Courtesy Getty

Harleen Kalsi
Harleen feeds off her nomadic spirit and incessant shenanigans on the road to stay alive. When not writing, she is busy searching for a good read/art/act.