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    The city of Bengaluru has a new luxury shopping destination. The House of Angadi recently launched ‘Angadi Heritage’, an 18,000 sq ft space that offers textile enthusiasts a sensory experience. K. Radharaman, the founder, CEO and design head of the brand who has previously launched two subsidiary labels, Angadi Galleria and his limited edition design label ADVAYA under the umbrella of House of Angadi wanted to conceive a space where design aficionados could immerse in a complete shopping experience; Angadi Heritage is a clear manifestation of that. The space will not only house his own labels; he has also curated an edit of designers from all over India.

    Image: Courtesy House of Angadi

    “Understated luxury defines my brand’s core. Traditionally in India, luxury is perceived in a certain nature – ornate and fitting the wedding bracket, which is one from of luxury. But then, there is everyday luxury as well that I feel is under-represented and therefore, you will get a curation of these specific brands here as their aesthetic aligns with ours,” says Radharaman. From designers such Anavila, Urvashi Kaur, 11.11, Injiri, Rimzim Dadu, Akaaro to menswear by Suket Dhir and Rajesh Pratap Singh, the space houses an interesting spectrum of designers.

    “They have a 600-year-old legacy, which is not a norm in India. House of Angadi belongs to a rare group of brands that have restored their legacy in Indian heritage, and it was like a serendipitous meeting of minds that brought me here,” says Dhir.

    Image: Courtesy House of Angadi

    In case you want to pick up homegrown accessory brands, there is Nappa Dori. Beauty aficionados also have an interesting array of products, including Pure Earth and The Perfume Library. That brand that catapulted to fame after Deepika Padukone wore their bridal saree is celebrated for its heritage textiles, signature motifs, and rare techniques. From textile restoration to innovation, the House of Angadi does it all. The brand has a deep focus on age-old techniques as well. They have worked on celebrated Mubbhagam sarees that demonstrate different proportions and interplay of colours, typical of a traditional Kanjeevaram sari; and the traditional Zari Kattam (checks) with extra zari weft and a wide tissue border. They have also created saris using traditional Korvai technique, which are unique of Kanchipuram.

    Image: Courtesy House of Angadi

    The moment you step into Angadi Heritage, you witness uncompromising attention to detail. Besides the glistening epoxy floor against vibrant palette of saris, there are restored and unique art pieces, antique furniture, and inverted railings hanging from the ceiling that stand out as a cultural insignia.

    Image: Courtesy House of Angadi

    Radharaman closely worked with award-winning architects Brinda Somaya and Abha Narain Lambah to design the store. While the exteriors were designed by Somaya similar to multi-tiered structure of the South Indian temples, interiors were taken care of by Lambah who relied on the textile heritage of the brand as an inspiration. Bengaluru’s revered Vidhan Soudha inspired the high windows while other elements were drawn from Chettinad and other Dravidian architecture styles.

    As a part of the launch, a series of textile installations comprising of Radharaman’s Linen Kanjeevaram, unique 3 three-layered fabric with metallic yarn and his experiments with traditional Ikkat, which are all a part of Advaya, were also presented.

    Anupam Dabral
    Sr. Associate Editor
    It was while studying fashion journalism at London College of Fashion that Anupam developed a keen interest in the anthropological aspect of the discipline; for him, fashion only makes sense when seen in the context of its environment. He is always on the hunt for great stories, and in his spare time binge-watches films/shows starring Whoopi Goldberg, Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders.