At the mere mention of the United States of America, many would automatically think of the Big Apple — New York City — or head further west and there’s Sin City, Las Vegas and City of Angels, Los Angeles. As we go down the list of popular cities in the US, Massachusetts’ capital, Boston, would just barely make it to the list. Then, we wondered — why is one of the oldest cities in the US not on everyone’s top five states to visit?

Boston, home to about 700,000 residents, is a city that is rich in culture and history. It’s also a known fact that Boston is a thriving port city, in the past and present; situated onshore the Atlantic Ocean, but do you know that Boston is the only state capital in the contiguous United States with an oceanic shoreline? Hence, the reason why Boston is often associated with its abundant seafood.

Beacon Hill. Photo by Tiffany Chan on Unsplash.
Photo by Alex Iby on Unsplash.

Historic sights are plentiful, undoubtedly at almost every nook and cranny of the city that you shouldn’t miss out — but there’s definitely much more to do in the city than just revisiting history. Here’s the complete guide on what to do and eat in Boston, Massachusetts.

Getting there

Cathay Pacific offers flights to Boston; three weekly flights directly from Hong Kong. Boston was put onto Cathay Pacific’s map in 2015, making them the first and only airline to operate a non-stop service between Hong Kong and the city.

The 16-hour flight from Hong Kong to Boston may sound a little daunting, but travelling in business class will surely turn your experience into a pleasant one. You’ll have your own exclusive cabin 35,000 feet in the air, with top-notch hospitality by the flight attendants, award-winning seats and restaurant-style dining. With just a click of a button, you can adjust your seating preference, from a sitting position to a fully flat bed — whether you are dining, watching a movie or getting some shut-eye.

But before you board onto your flight, visit any of Cathay Pacific’s premium airport lounges at Hong Kong International Airport, which all Business Class passengers have access to.

What to do

Fenway Park. Photo: Todd Kent on Unsplash.

You can take the most touristy route there is, which includes walking the Freedom Trail, Boston Duck Tours and going to a Red Sox game at Fenway Park — but this is the easiest way to learn about the history of Boston. Freedom Trail is a 4km walk through downtown Boston, with 16 historical sights of that tell the story of the American Revolution. Boston Duck Tours allow you to see the city in a matter of hours. Fenway Park is the oldest baseball stadium in Major League Baseball, with an area filled with restaurants and bars that are also worth exploring.

Newbury Street is one of the most recognisable streets in Boston. It is home to many restaurants, bars and shops so you can eat and shop until you drop. Faneuil Hall Marketplace, both a historic site and a shopping centre, is also one you should visit while you’re here. Another popular marketplace is the Boston Public Market — it’s the US’s only year-round, indoor, locally sustained public market. 35 New England artisans and food producers are all under one roof, you can shop for local produce or just grab lunch here.

Enough shopping and eating? Walk it out by visiting Beacon Hill. It’s dubbed as the cutest street n the US, and we understand why. The architecture, cobblestone streets and brick row homes add on to its charm. This may be the most Instagrammable street in Boston, so be sure to come dressed and have your camera ready. The North End is also one that you should add on to your must-visit list. As intimidating as the name sounds, the North End is actually one of the most cultural neighbourhoods in Boston. It’s considered the ‘Little Italy’ of Boston, like a maze of narrow streets filled with Italian restaurants, bars and pastry shops. Get to the outskirts of the neighbourhood and you’ll be greeted with ocean views.

What to eat

Seafood seems to be on everyone’s checklist whenever they visit Boston, which doesn’t come to a surprise. Seafood eateries are definitely plenty, ranging from little bars that serve fresh oysters and lobster rolls to full-fledged seafood restaurants. For a quick bite, have a lobster roll at Red’s Best, located inside Boston Public Market — and since you’re there, we recommend getting the apple cider drink or doughnuts from Red Apple Farm. Legal Harborside is a full-fledged seafood restaurant, and by full-fledged, we mean three floors of varying dining experience. On the street level is an all-day casual dining area, the first floor focuses on a more formal and elevated cuisine while the rooftop bar and lounge sits on top.

Once you’ve had your fill of seafood, it’s time to venture out to other cuisines. The amount of popular eateries in Boston is uncountable, and it would be way too long if we were to list it all down. If you are staying there for a week, you’ll definitely be able to try something new every day including Craigie on Main’s Secret Burger — claimed to be the best burger in town. Fish and chips is also a must-have here. This London classic has made its way to this side of the city, and you can get the best Fish and Chips at The Barking Crab.

Desserts? Plenty. Mike’s Pastry at the historic North End has the best cannolis in town. Since you’re in Boston, why not try the dessert that has the name of the city in it, Boston Cream Pie. You can still have the most authentic version at Omni Parker House Hotel (previously known as Parker House Hotel), but there are many great renditions of this classic dessert in Flour Bakery, Union Square Donuts and Magnolia Bakery. Harvard Square has also recently welcomed cult-favourite Milk Bar, where you can get its iconic milk ice cream and cookies.

Jolin Lee
Contributor
Unlike most modern-day millennials, Jolin does not need caffeine or alcohol to power through the day (and night). Her eye for beauty is as sharp as her eyeliner flick, and she can spot your unblended eye makeup from a mile away.