Scenario: you buy a new tube of lipstick in a shade you’ve always wanted. It seems like a decent formula when you swatch it in the store, but after putting it on, you find that it fades with one bite of lunch — straight up not what you’d want from a lipstick. Hold off from tossing your lipstick into the dustbin and giving up entirely. Try these five quick and easy steps to make your lipstick last longer. Plus point: you don’t have to frustrate yourself with hourly reapplications. Alternatively, if the steps are too extensive for you, invest in a good liquid lipstick.

Exfoliate your lips

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Have a smooth canvas for your lipstick to glide on with freshly exfoliated lips. Brands like Lush and Philosophy sell lip exfoliators that nourish and remove dead skin from your lips, preventing them from looking patchy.

Block out your lips

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When you’re applying foundation, dab a light amount over your lips to turn them skin-toned. You’ll not only have a hint of traction to give creamier lipsticks a grip, but eliminating the natural colour of your lips to allow the colour of the lipstick to be brighter.

Line your lips

Clarins Nude Lipliner Pencils Review Swatches (14)
Photo credit: The Sunday Girl

Next, mark out the shape of your lips with a lip liner and fill it in. This prevents your lipstick from bleeding into the fine lines around your lips, or settling into the crevices of your mouth.

Apply and blot

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Apply your first coat of lipstick, then blot with a tissue. Instead of pursing your lips on the tissue, open your mouth in an “o” shape and place a sheet of tissue over it, pressing down lightly. This removes the excess oil and product to prevent transferring and smudging.

Brush setting powder over your lips

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Use a lightweight setting powder and lightly dab some over your lips to set the lipstick base. This is only if you’re using a super slippery formula with higher oil content. The key is to use a really finely milled powder to avoid any discomfort. Cap it off by applying one final coat, and you’re good to go.

Beatrice Bowers
Features Editor
Beatrice Bowers writes about beauty, drinks, and other nice things. When not bound to her keyboard, she moonlights as a Niffler for novels and can be found en route to bankruptcy at your nearest bookstore. Don't tell her boss.