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Here’s where you can try Squid Game’s Dalgona challenge in Singapore

If you haven’t already watched Squid Game on Netflix yet, bookmark this page and come back once you’re done.

A quick recap: The survival show centres around 456 participants, each trapped and forced to play childhood games for a tempting prize, except elimination just means death. No biggie. In one particular episode (episode three), the contestants have to carve out shapes from a honeycomb-like mixture, also known as Dalgona.

squid game
Image credit: Netflix

Yes, they share the same name as the frenzied lockdown drink of 2020, but what the candy version is, is actually a toffee-like treat from South Korea, made simply with sugar and baking soda. Traditionally, these candy cookies come with a shape embossed in the mixture before it hardens, and customers play a game to bite off the outer layer of the candy while keeping the inner shape intact. If you succeed, the ahjummas running these stalls tend to give you another free piece too.

The challenge isn’t as rosy as this though. In the show, players have to trace the inner shape within two minutes with the help of a needle, and anyone who breaks the shape? Well, let’s just say gunshots were fired.

If you’re caught up in the hype of the show and you’re looking for a place in Singapore to try the Dalgona challenge yourself, here’s where you can: Brown Butter Cafe.

Here, they’ll serve you three shapes to cut from — the circle, star or heart — and diners get to trace the shape in the same two-minute limit. Those who manage to do so can choose from a random selection of prizes that range from Ali’s pebbles to a free iced latte or cheesecake. Didn’t make the cut? Heads up — a black box with a pink ribbon will be waiting for you.

Brown Butter Cafe will be serving the challenge from now to 24 October during the weekdays from 12 pm to 6 pm.

Jocelyn Tan
Senior Writer
Jocelyn Tan is a travel and design writer who's probably indulging in serial killer podcasts or reading one too many books on East Asian history. When she actually gets to travel, you can find her attempting to stuff her entire wardrobe into her luggage. Yes, she's a chronic over-packer.