From the fake ivory label everyone in Singapore is talking about to Constance Wu’s Crazy Rich Asians red carpet couture coup, catch up on everything that’s happening in fashion right now — as seen through the ’gram.

Fake label Ivory Lane was a smart WWF ploy to raise awareness of the loopholes in Singapore’s wildlife trade law

About two weeks ago, the name Ivory Lane surged on Instagram. Upon discovery, the new Singaporean label claimed to be sustainable while offering products made of ivory, an unethical material notoriously known to be harvested through the illegal poaching of elephants. Vexed comments soon overflowed. More so when the label posted its defensive explanation via Instagram Stories saying it adhered to Singapore’s trading law as all its “ivory products are made of vintage ivory, before 1990.”

Mere days later, it was revealed (prematurely) that Ivory Lane was a brand fabricated by WWF-Singapore to spotlight the loopholes of wildlife laws in the country. A statement said, “Though the brand may be fictional, the issues highlighted are real. Our recent investigation has found over 40 shops in Singapore selling ivory products.”

Bravo, WWF-Singapore, for making us pause mid-scroll, sit up and shift our attention to the little things that can largely affect the livelihoods of these gentle giants elsewhere. Watch the investigative video here.

Constance Wu’s Crazy Rich Asians premiere dress, dissected in numbers

Crazy Rich Asians is, hands down, the summer’s most anticipated release. Its all-Asian cast’s leading lady Constance Wu — whom you’d know by now as the flick’s Rachel Chu — dazzlingly took over the red carpet at the movie’s Hollywood premiere at TCL Chinese theatre. Styled by Micaela Erlanger, the celebrity stylist behind the stellar looks of Lupita Nyong’o and Diane Kruger, Wu wore an off-the-shoulder Ralph and Russo gown scattered with Swarovski crystals.

“The film is based around both luxury and fashion, making a couture red-carpet moment all the more perfect for the world premiere,” shared Erlanger to Vogue. In numbers, the opulent couture moment involved 490 hours of hand embroidery, 200,000 crystals and 275 hours of construction.

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