In recent years, more fashion companies are pledging to adopt ethical and sustainable ways of doing business. One route is by incorporating the use of biodegradable materials or sustainable fabrics to reduce wastage and carbon footprint. Thanks to advancements in technology and talented researchers, the fashion industry might soon be seeing more sustainable textiles made out of food sources such as, mushrooms, oranges and grapes. Here’s more.

 

Orange Fiber – textile made out of oranges
Off shoulders top from H&M Conscious 2019 collection and Orange Fiber fabric
Off shoulders top from H&M Conscious 2019 collection and Orange Fiber fabric (Photo credit: H&M and Orange Fiber)

Orange Fiber is an Italian company that creates sustainable and quality fabrics made from oranges. The citrus waste is developed and spun into silk-like cellulose yarn through an extraction procedure called “pastazzo”. Thereafter, the yarn can be woven or blended alongside other materials to create their luxurious textiles. In conjunction with their Conscious 2019 collection, H&M incorporated the use of Orange Fiber textiles among other sustainable materials made with recycled plastics, recycled glass and organic fabrics.

Find out more about Orange Fiber here.

 

SeaCell – fabric made out of seaweed
SeaCell fabric made out of dried seaweed that is then engineered into cellulose fiber
SeaCell fabric made out of dried seaweed that is then engineered into cellulose fibre (Photo credit: SeaCell)

SeaCell fabric is manufactured using a patented “Lyocell” process. This non-chemical and eco friendly production method embeds layers of crushed seaweed firmly within the pockets of cellulose fibre. The fabric is not only silky smooth; the vitamins and minerals found within the seaweed is said to relieve skin inflammation and soothe itchiness.

Find out more about SeaCell here.

 

S.Café by Singtex – material made out of coffee beans
S.Cafe fabric made out of recycled coffee grounds and fashion items made from the S.Cafe material
S.Café fabric made out of recycled coffee grounds and fashion items made from the S.Café material (Photo credit: S.Café and Clarissa Wei)

S.Café’s patented technological processes make yarn out of coffee grounds while coffee essence is turned into textiles and cosmetics. The yarn is also combined with Lyocell filament to create sefía fibre, another natural fabric that purport to control odour and absorb moisture. Brands that have jumped on board include Timberland, North Face and Hugo Boss.

Find out more about S.Café here.

 

MycoTEX by NEFFA – material made out of mushroom roots
MycoTEX material made out of mycelium, the roots of mushrooms and a bodice featuring a garment prototype made out of MycoTEX material
MycoTEX material made out of mycelium, the roots of mushrooms and a bodice featuring a garment prototype made out of MycoTEX material (Photo credit: MycoTEX)

MycoTEX uses layers of mushrooms to create raw material that could be used to construct clothing, packaging and even furniture. The usage of the textile also shortens the supply chain greatly since it does not require weaving or sewing which rakes up costs, consumes time, and energy. The material can also be used to construct other fashion items such as handbags, pouches, and vests.

Find out more about MycoTEX here.

 

Vegea – alternative leather made out of grape waste from wine production
Vegea wine leather made out of grape leftovers from wine production
Vegea wine leather made out of grape leftovers from wine production (Photo credit: Vegea)

Who would have thought that grapes could be used to produce alternative leather? Italian company Vegea produced a new leather-like material made out from wine making by-products like grape skins, seeds and stalks. Fashion designer Tiziano Guardini, a pioneer in using natural materials such as pine bark and recycled fishing nets have also created fashion forward looks out of Vegea’s ‘leather’.

Find out more about Vegea here.

Josiah Chua
Fashion Director
Josiah is the Fashion Director in charge of styling shoots and writing the fashion pages. On his days off, he locks himself at home designing and sewing up a collection in preparation for his label's runway debut.